LINKEDIN TIPS FROM AUTHENTIC ALEX

THE EUROPEAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IN SRI LANKA RECENTLY ORGANIZED A SESSION FEATURING ALEXANDRA GALVIZ, ONE OF LINKEDIN’S TOP VOICES 2017/18

LinkedIn has proved essential not only for professionals to stay connected, but for organizations to gain authenticity. Business is about relationships, and Alexandra Galviz says LinkedIn allows relationships to grow. LinkedIn also gives thought leaders a platform to voice their ideas. However, while LinkedIn is oversaturated in the UK, there are only four to five profiles in Sri Lanka with large followings.

Here are some tips from Authentic Alex to become a LinkedIn influencer…

TOP REASONS FOR NOT SUCCEEDING
INFREQUENT POST:
The LinkedIn algorithm favours users who post regularly. If users make regular posts, LinkedIn shares their content with more people. If the regular schedule is stopped, the algorithm is likely to stop playing favourites.

OVERSATURATION:
Posting more than twice daily is also likely to get one on the bad side of the algorithm. Let the audience digest the content. Focus on quality over quantity.

INAUTHENTIC:
As video has become the most popular method of sharing content, so has people’s ability to spot those trying to be inauthentic. People can see right through the lens. Being inauthentic is a quick way to get ignored. Being a jack of all trades: It’s easier to build relationships and trust if one is known to be an expert in one niche. When delivering a service, a professional is expected to know everything about it. Trying to be a jack of all trades with different messages would lead to confusion.

DIRECT SALES:
The LinkedIn algorithm discriminates against direct sales through the platform. This does not mean it cannot be done; it can, if one is smart about it. Do not: advertise a price list or use key words associated with sales.

Do: generate interest for a product through creative content that would compel the audience to make contact to buy a product or service.

SPRUCE UP YOUR PROFILE
CHANGE TO A CUSTOM URL: Instead of having a LinkedIn profile web address ending in a long combination of numbers, change it to a name, brand name or something more creative and easy to remember.

A GOOD PROFILE PHOTO: A professional-looking photo with a simple background. Expression should find a balance between being serious and funny. Pass on that vacation photo. Users with a profile photo are 21 times more likely to be noticed, as a face is more relatable than a grey icon.

USE A COVER PHOTO: Many still use LinkedIn’s generic cover graphic. Change it to a company logo or tagline that describes what services are offered. Think of it as a store front.

HEADLINE: Describe yourself and what can be done for the audience using key words. A website address could be included.

SUMMARY: Use first-person speech to be relatable. Tell a story, and include personal interests. Tell something shocking to gain attention. Explain why you should be picked over someone else. Give the audience a call to action to make them hit the follow button and revisit the profile. Be humorous in telling the story; make someone laugh and become memorable. Be authentic and attract like-minded professionals to build the network and do business with.

De-activate notifications prior to editing the profile: Or incur the wrath of followers as they get spammed with notifications as a profile is edited. Reactivate notifications after final edits are done to send one notification, which will drive traffic to the profile.

USE PERSONAL PROFILES INSTEAD OF CORPORATE PAGES: The LinkedIn algorithm favours personal pages over corporate ones. No matter how many followers a corporate profile has, personal pages are promoted better, until LinkedIn revamps its code, and build brands through the personal pages of company directors, C-Suite officials and top managers.

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